FELASA collaboration on Cephalopods

Posted on: 10-09-2012

Devoloping guidelines for the care and welfare of Cephalopods under European directive 2010/63/EU

 

From January 2013 ‘all living cephalopods’ will necessitate attention similar to that reserved until now to vertebrate animals, following their inclusion in the revised European directive 2010/63/EU on the “Protection of animals used in Scientific Research”.This necessitates the development of Guidelines for Care and Welfare of Cephalopod species. This initiative is devoted primarily towards the species commonly used for research in the EU including: Octopus vulgaris, Sepia officinalis and a few species of squids.

The Cephalopod guidelines will be produced by a unique collaboration between:

  • CephRes - a non-profit association aimed to promote the advancement of biological research with particular reference to Cephalopods.
  • The Boyd Group - a UK based forum for open exchange of views on issues related to the use of animals in science.
  • FELASA - representing the common interest in the furtherance of all aspects of laboratory animal science in Europe and beyond. 

The production of Guidelines will be coordinated by a small Steering Group drawn from the three constituent organisations and co–chaired by Graziano Fiorito (President, CephRes) and Paul Andrews (Chair, Boyd Group Cephalopod Working Group).

This initiative builds on:

  • meetings of Cephalopod experts organised by CephRes in 2011 and 2012, and
  • the work of a Boyd Group Working Group on Cephalopods set up in 2010 to address issues raised by the inclusion of Cephalopods in 2010/63/EU from a UK perspective.

The production of Guidelines will be coordinated by a small Steering Group drawn from the three constituent organisations and co–chaired by Graziano Fiorito (President, CephRes) and Paul Andrews (Chair, Boyd Group Cephalopod Working Group).

The Guidelines will cover all aspects of care and welfare of Cephalopods in research including: supply, capture and transport; environment and control; housing, enrichment and care; assessment of health and disease prevention; scientific procedures; training of animal care staff and users. Specific requirement for common laboratory species will be covered in detailed tabular appendices. Drafting of each section will be led by one or two experts who will work with a small team of co-authors.

Drafts will be widely circulated for comment including to organisations with specific concern for the welfare of laboratory animals to ensure that the final document represents current best practice.

It is aimed to launch the Guidelines at the FELASA/ SECAL Congress in Barcelona June 2013.

Regular updates on progress will be posted on the web sites of the three organisations.